Engineering Day Registration

Engineering Day 2016


Saturday, November 5th, 2016
9:00 a.m.
Warnock Engineering Building Catmull Gallery
72 S. Central Campus Drive
Salt Lake City, UT

Please contact Morgan Boyack at morgan.boyack@utah.edu with questions about the event, the registration process, or if a presentation you are interested in is full.

Due to capacity limitations: Registration for this event is open only to high school students, their parents, and prospective transfer students.

Parents are welcome to attend but do not need to register. They will have special parent sessions.

Schedule

8:45 – 9:25

Check In: Meet with advisors, engineering students, and faculty. Pick up info packets. Get your personalized schedule.

9:30 – 9:55

Welcome by the Dean of Engineering

10:00 – 10:30

Session 1

10:45 – 11:15

Session 2

11:30 – 12:00

Session 3

12:00

Lunch

12:30

Conclusion

Registration opens October 10th, 2016

Event Details


Silk-Elastin-Like Proteins are helping in the Medical Field
Host Department: Bioengineering
Max capacity: 27

Description: Silk-elastin-like protein (SEL copolymers may be used to embolize tumor vasculature. The SELP solution is an injectable liquid at room temperature and forms a hydrogel in the tumor vasculature at body temperature. The material may be loaded with one or more chemotherapeutic drugs which may be released into the tumor from the embolic agents. Aneurysms and Arteriovenous Malformations (AVM) are conditions in which blood vessels are deformed in such a way as to increase the likelihood of rupture. One method for treatment of these conditions is the use of an embolic that reduces or eliminates blood flow in the affected region to prevent hemorrhage. Silk-elastinlike protein polymers (SELP) have been engineered as thermally responsive hydrogels, transitioning from a liquid to a solid gel at body temperature. SELP combines the strength of Bombyx mori (silkworm) silk and the flexibility of mammalian elastin via genetic recombination. This technology proposes that SELP can be injected via balloon microcatheter in order to form a plug that shields the weakened vasculature from shear forces associated with blood flow and facilitates the ingrowth of neointima across the mouth of the aneurysm. Physicochemical properties of silica nanoparticles such as size, charge, surface functionality, shape, hydrophobicity, and aggregation state determine their biological interactions. Size and porosity of silica nanoparticles among other properties are known to be predominant parameters modulating toxicity profiles of particles. Variation in size of spherical particles were sown to affect protein stabilization and conformational shapes of adsorbed proteins. Little is known about the extent and type of protein adsorption on silica nanoparticles as a function of size and porosity, and their subsequent influence on cellular uptake, toxicity, and internalization mechanisms.

Tesla Diffusion Imaging and Deep Brain Stimulation
Host Department: Bioengineering
Max capacity: 18

Description: Learn about deep brain stimulation and how it relates to Parkinson\\\\’s and other disorders, and how we\\\\’re using new imaging techniques to help improve DBS targeting.

Tissue Engineering Complex Systems
Host Department: Bioengineering
Max capacity: 21

Description: Regenerative medicine and tissue engineering seeks to heal tissue that the body doesn’t have the capacity to heal on its own. For example cartilage and ligaments do not heal well on their own, therefore therapeutics are needed to properly heal this tissue to allow restoration of full functionality. In the field of tissue engineering we develop these therapeutics by using the latest technology to create the irregular shapes and complex patterns within our tissues. In this session we will talk about this technology and do some fun demos to demonstrate the basic concepts of tissue engineering.

What is Bioengineering?
Host Department: Bioengineering
Max capacity: 60

Description: Come learn about bioengineering from current students. They will give a brief overview of some of the research strengths: Biomaterials, Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine; Biomedical Device Design and Development; Biomechanics; Biomedical Imaging, Computing, Modeling and Visualization; Biosensors and Molecular Engineering; Cardiovascular Engineering; Neural Engineering and Neuroprosthetics; and Pharmaceutics and Targeted Drug Delivery.

Integrated Circuits – What is Inside Computer Chips?
Host Department: Computer Engineering
Max capacity: 25

Description: Computer chips (integrated circuits) are composed of many thousands, millions, or even billions of tiny transistors, all integrated onto a single tiny sliver of silicon. In this lab tour we’ll peek under the cover of some integrated circuits to see what makes them tick. You’ll hear about what goes into making integrated circuits, look at how they are designed by University of Utah students, and look at some chips under the microscope to see what they look like when you open them up.

Chemical Engineering Projects Lab
Host Department: Chemical Engineering
Max capacity: 15

Description: A chemical engineer is trained to work in a wide range of fields. He or she may work in the medical field designing micron-scale diagnostic tests, in the cosmetic field producing mascara that won’t run, or in the fuels industry managing distillation columns. This tour of our undergraduate teaching laboratories will highlight the variety inherent within chemical engineering and demonstrate the diversity of equipment our students are trained to use.

Nanofab Laboratory Tour
Host Department: Chemical Engineering
Max capacity: 55

Description: Nanotechnology is a big thing as it can be found everywhere these days; from computer chips, to sensors in your phone, to next generation medical technologies and treatments.This presentation and tour is a brief examination of what makes modern nanotechnologies work, what we use them for, and how they are made. We also go over the principals of building, designing, and inventing on the micro/nano-scale. Plus we also talk about how engineering on the extremely small-scale must be approached differently then on the large scale.We will also be giving a tour of the Nano-fabrication Laboratory where you can see the massive amount of equipment it takes to build something so small.

What is Chemical Engineering
Host Department: Chemical Engineering
Max capacity: 50

Description: In this presentation you will learn about the variety of careers open to the professional chemical engineer, and see examples of chemical engineering core concepts by way of several demonstrations. This session will be led by undergraduate members of the department of chemical engineering’s outreach team, and they will also talk about college lie and preparing to become an engineering student

Earthquake Lab
Host Department: Civil and Environmental Engineering
Max capacity: 20

Description: Utah is earthquake country where a major earthquake could happen in the near future. This laboratory presents hands-on experiments which describe earthquake phenomena such as: tectonic faulting, strong ground motion and building damage and soil liquefaction. Come see how these phenomena damage infrastructure and what civil engineers do to make your life safer and less susceptible to these events. The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering earthquake mobile lab presents hands-on experiments to show the nature of earthquakes and the types of damage caused following large events. Participants will learn about the types and effects of earthquake waves, the nature of earthquake faulting, and soil liquefaction. The tour is interactive with experiments and multimedia presentations. Come learn about earthquakes and their potential threats to Utah.

Smart Infrastructure
Host Department: Civil and Environmental Engineering
Max capacity: 25

Description: The fusion of technology and infrastructure systems has emerged as a critical part of the future of Civil, Environmental, and Construction Engineering. The use of sensing systems, data management, data processing and simulation tools, visual analytics, and technologies are now part of everyday practice in the planning, design, management, and operation of buildings, transportation networks, water systems, water and wastewater treatment technologies, and more that fall under the purview of Civil and Environmental Engineers. This presentation will highlight the recent advances in the Smart Infrastructure areas and the future of the field and what role Civil, Environmental, and Construction Engineers will play. The presentation will include description of examples, hands-on demonstrations, show and tell of technologies, and lab tours.

Structures and Materials Lab
Host Department: Civil and Environmental Engineering
Max capacity: 20

Description: In the Structures and Materials Lab of the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, participants will be able to witness the catastrophic destruction of concrete as it undergoes an impact load. An impact load is similar to that of a truck hitting a building or barrier. Different improvements to conventional concrete, which includes adding short fibers that can hold the concrete together so that building occupants can safely leave a building if it were subjected to such high impact loading or even earthquake loading. Participants will also have a tour of the Structures and Materials Lab in which they will see current on-going research for seismic retrofit and repair of structures.

Traffic Lab
Host Department: Civil and Environmental Engineering
Max capacity: 20

Description: The Utah Traffic Lab is a transportation research facility within the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. Engineering Day participants will learn about the different research projects that have been performed in the lab and the different tools used by traffic and transportation engineers. The focus of the presentations and demonstrations will be on the dangers of distracted driving. The participants will have an opportunity to participate in a short driving simulator demonstration that will measure their reaction times under different driving conditions.The Utah Traffic Lab is a transportation research facility within the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. Engineering Day participants will learn about the different research projects that have been performed in the lab and the different tools used by traffic and transportation engineers. They can also participate in driving simulator demonstrations related to designing innovative intersections and studying driving while distracted.

Electronic Instrument Art
Host Department: Electrical Engineering
Max capacity: 20

Description: Experience the entertaining process of creating interesting visual patterns on the screen of an oscilloscope. With the help of your tour guide, this hands on experience will allow you to experiment in a safe and interesting way with lab instruments used by electronics students.

High Frequency Amplifiers to Improve Battery Life
Host Department: Electrical Engineering
Max capacity: 10

Description: We will demonstrate a variety of transmitters for Cell Phones and Wireless LAN and show how they are measured. The transmitters and amplifiers are designed to require less energy from your battery.

Atomic Force Microscope
Host Department: Mechanical Engineering
Max capacity: 3

Description: The microscope is a type of scanning probe microscopy (SPM), with demonstrated resolution on the order of fractions of a nanometer, more than 1000 times better than the optical diffraction limit. The information is gathered by \\\\\\\\”feeling\\\\\\\\” or \\\\\\\\”touching\\\\\\\\” the surface with a mechanical probe. Piezoelectric elements that facilitate tiny but accurate and precise movements on (electronic) command enable very precise scanning.

Energy Harvesting for Wireless Electronics
Host Department: Mechanical Engineering
Max capacity: 20

Description: There are billions upon billions of wirelessly enabled electronics devices in the world. They almost all run on batteries, which have to be periodically recharged. In some cases, this is not big deal, but in many cases its very limiting or at least very inconvenient. We look for ways to harvest enough energy from the operating environment to power wireless devices such as activity trackers, wearable health monitors, wireless sensors in cars, trains or manufacturing environments, wireless biomedical implants, etc. The goal is to make them completely battery free. I’ll talk about our work to harvest energy from mechanical vibrations, human motion, and using ultrasound to wirelessly power biomedical implants. In all of these cases there is significant functionality that is enabled by making the devices battery free.

Engineering Energy Storage Devices
Host Department: Mechanical Engineering
Max capacity: 8

Description: Imagine being able to charge your cell phone in a matter of seconds, or charging it a million times without losing any energy storage capacity. Electrochemical capacitors (also known as “supercapacitors”) are energy storage devices with the potential to replace batteries in high power, high cycle life energy storage applications, including consumer electronics, renewable energy, and electric vehicles. In our research lab, we are developing new materials and methods to increase the energy storage capabilities of supercapacitors. We are also investigating ways to make electrochemical energy storage devices more environmentally friendly, including developing biodegradable supercapacitors.

Head Injury Biomechanics Lab
Host Department: Mechanical Engineering
Max capacity: 15

Description: The head injury biomechanics lab at the U investigates how forces impact the human body, and how the human body responds to those forces. Our research focuses on understanding mechanisms of traumatic brain and eye injury, and how we can develop better age-dependent metrics for predicting, diagnosing and treating head injury in children and adults. Graduate and undergraduate students in the lab will provide mini-presentations on each of their research projects.

Move Like a Microbe
Host Department: Mechanical Engineering
Max capacity: 10

Description: Many microorganisms such as bacteria, including the E. coli that lives in our guts, can swim. Due to their small size, swimming microorganisms experience the watery environment in a very different way than we do when we swim. This hands-on exhibit aims to demonstrate some of the features of small-scale swimming. You will try different swimming strokes to see what motions work for propulsion at small scales.

Nanoscale Imaging, Analysis, and Power Generation
Host Department: Mechanical Engineering
Max capacity: 5

Description: Learn how we do exciting research at the nanometer scale. A nanometer is a unit of length equal to one billionth of a meter, which is approximately your hair thickness divided by ten thousands! Developing a “microscope” to see extremely small features at a nanometer scale is exciting but challenging. Moreover, making use of physics at such small scales will make a huge impact to future power generation. You will tour our Radiation Lab, where we are conducting cutting-edge research about power generation at nanoscales

Achieving Sustainable and Safe Nuclear Energy
Host Department: Metallurgical Engineering
Max capacity: 35

Description: Learn how radioactive waste from spent nuclear fuel can be encapsulated into rock-like materials that are suitable for safe and permanent disposal in deep geologic repositories. Students will have the opportunity to handle simulated nuclear waste samples. And the process for making these materials will be explained. This is a fascinating demonstration of how metallurgical engineering can be applied to benefit the environment and support use of a sustainable energy source.

Breaking up is Easy to Do: Rock Testing
Host Department: Mining Engineering
Max capacity: 15

Description: The physical properties of rocks are important in mining material from the earth. In order to design a safe mine a mining engineer needs information about the density, grade, and strength of the rock. The size and shape of the mine causes stresses in the rock and if we know the rocks properties we can account for this in the mine design. We will conduct a rock strength test using a machine that breaks a rock specimen and measures its compressive strength. You will be surprised – Breaking up is easy to do.

Subsidence from Space
Host Department: Mining Engineering
Max capacity: 15

Description: Geologic time is now! Earthquakes, active volcanic systems, glaciers, and landslides can all deform the structure of the earth’s surface. Deformation also occurs as a result of development of infrastructure and natural resources, and as earth scientists and engineers, we are often interested in measuring changes, both natural and manmade, in structure of the earth’s surface.But how can we measure displacements over large areas of the earth’s surface, when we don’t necessarily know exactly where or when the displacements are going to occur? Light waves!There aren’t any sharks with laser beams, but we will be learning about the properties of electro-magnetic waves that allow us to measure deformation of the earth’s surface. It turns out light waves are pretty cool, even if you aren’t an evil genius (but it is okay if you are).

Utah Mining Robotics Project
Host Department: Mining Engineering
Max capacity: 6

Description: The Utah Robotic Mining Project is an exciting opportunity for students to develop skills in robotics, autonomous mining, and engineering project management while simultaneously engaging the community in fostering an understanding about the role of mining and robotics in our daily lives. Come drive the robot that took 3rd place at the NASA competition in May 2015.

Virtual Reality in Operations
Host Department: Mining Engineering
Max capacity: 6

Description: Immersive Technologies is the global leader in the development and deployment of Equipment Simulators, Learning Systems, Consulting and Analytics in the resources sector. Come try Immersive Technologies latest Virtual Reality based simulator, and experience firsthand the heavy equipment used within the construction and mining industries. Discuss with industry professionals the current state of workforce development in resource industries, and supportive technologies for the future.

Energy Materials Laboratory
Host Department: Materials Science and Engineering
Max capacity: 18

Description: Our research centers around the theme of energy. We investigate both renewable sources like thermoelectrics, batteries, and fuel cells as well as conventional sources like turbine engines, coal, and natural gas. A major component of the research we do involves synthesizing new materials, characterizing their structure, and then measuring electrical, thermal or other properties. Lab tour participants will see 3D printers, 3D scanners, tools and equipment for making ceramics and intermetallics, and devices for measuring thermal and electrical transport.

Computer Programming
Host Department: School of Computing
Max capacity: 20

Description: Try your hand at programming as you develop an interactive art application with School of Computing lecturer David Johnson. This hands-on session will show you some programming basics and guide you to a working graphics project

Entertainment Arts and Engineering-Game Design
Host Department: School of Computing
Max capacity: 58

Description: Learn about the Entertainment Arts and Engineering (currently ranked 1st in the nation for game development programs) will include a brief presentation about the program, a Q&A session with students in both the graduate and undergraduate program.

Robot Learning for Manipulation
Host Department: School of Computing
Max capacity: 30

Description: What is a robot? How do you get them to do what you want? Come learn the basics of robotic manipulators and programming! You\’ll help teach the two-armed Baxter robot to perform a simple task, learning some fundamentals of computer programming along the way.

Visualization Design Lab
Host Department: School of Computing
Max capacity: 20

Description: In the Visualization Design Lab, we deal with all kinds of data, and discover better or even new ways to look at the data. From weather forecasting for wildfire fighters, to prioritizing where to place armor on tanks, to finding ways to visualize the sonic patterns in poetry, we deal with it all. Come learn some of the tricks of the trade, and learn how you can plug your own data into cutting-edge visualizations that the world\’s top scientists are using.